When Something I Love Became Something It Shouldn’t

*insert witty post preface that makes you want to read this post*

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This past June and July were intense writing months for me. I reread Draft Three of Beasts, found a dysfunctional story, and decided that I could and would fix it. Because that’s what I do. I fix things. And if I can’t fix something, it drives me just a little bit crazy. And so help me, I was going to fix this story if it killed me.

A lot of June went into brainstorming how this fixing was going to happen and figuring out just how much of the 90,000 word Draft Three was going to be axed. As it turns out, 85k met the sword in my pursuit of a better fourth draft. I was on a deadline, one I couldn’t move again, so I dove into rewriting (fourth time’s a charm, right?).

I enjoyed very few (translation: zero) of the hours upon hours upon hours poured into the actual rewrites. Between hating the story itself and being drained spiritually, emotionally, and mentally by the other things going on in my personal life, the last thing I wanted to do was try and put what little I had left into fixing that stupid, broken story. As I wrote, I came to dislike it even more because the story was too warped to fix in one draft, but I had to do what I could because I’d postponed the Deadline too much already (the Deadline was an editorial review with an amazing freelance editor).

So I wrote, and I hated it. Doing the writing. The words themselves. Coughing up thousands and thousands of brand new words. Feeling guilty on days I only wrote 1,000 words. Sick with stress that made my family question if it was worth it, if I should write when it so obviously drove me to further physical exhaustion, anxiety, and emotional distress. I was wound so tight that I was popping a couple times a week in one way or another.

But I’m a writer, and writers write.

So that’s what I did. I wrote. I lived and breathed that story for five whole weeks. My sun rose and fell on how much progress I’d made, how many words I’d put on the page, how many days spun between me and the Deadline, and if I thought I could make it. Because so help me, I was going to make it. My thoughts ran in a constant, dogged cycle of plot and characters and questions and cringing over how people would react. Oh, yes, I was always anxious about what people would think when they read it, a bit of black terror crunching my heart whenever I guessed what they’d say. Too dark. Too confusing. Too simple. Too choppy. Too weird. Underdeveloped. Not enough description. Trying too hard. Too many plot holes. Childish. And let’s not even get into that rushed excuse for an ending.

I finished it, though, and it came to just over 60,000 words with just one day to spare. So off it went to an editor, and I was finally freeeeeeeeeee.

Except I wasn’t.

The anxiety and fear hounded me, and the remnants of the story hung in my mind, saturating my thoughts still because the whole time I was writing, something was missing, something big. And the absence of this thing was what put me into such a frenetic state, and I knew it. I knew what was wrong, why I was so agitated and turbulent; it wasn’t just about stress or dedication or perseverance or getting too little sleep.

It came into sharp focus when I received my edits. My editor had so many good thoughts and critiques, but one thing she said, an offhand kind of comment, struck me: “I can’t wait to see what God will do with it once it’s even more polished.”

Ah, right. God. Him. You know, the One I’ve said up and down that my writing is for blah, blah, blah. Yeah, Him.

I knew I was writing without Him, knew I was driving a wedge between us by how everything else was mastering me. I did my devotions faithfully, and I sought Him… but not as hard as I sought to fix that story. It’s sadly ironic—I didn’t like even one aspect of writing and story at the time, yet it was the writing and story that dominated my thoughts, took hold of my emotions, and consumed my energy instead of devotion to my Christ.

What I loved became something it was never intended—by me or my Jesus—to be. Ever.

It was a twisted form of worship, not to God, but to myself and what I could accomplish, had to accomplish, devoid of my greatest Vision. And after writing with and for God as much as I have tried to, I was keenly aware of how hard it was to wrestle against Him and try and make Him bless my work while I carried and would not give up a double-heart. A heart that wanted Him but not enough to make me seek Him with everything like I used to. A heart that wanted His blessings and hand in my writing but not enough to live like it. A heart that took the story He gave me and made it into something less, much less.

And I’ve spent the last month lying to myself, telling myself that it was so hard because I procrastinated (though, that did happen), it was so hard because the story was too much to fix in one shot (though, it was to an extent), it was so hard because of all the other things going sideways in life, it was so hard because blah blah blah.

Well, no, it was so hard because I did it alone, because I did it hoping to create something incredible by myself. I was all at once terrified of what people would say and yearning for their praise and approval, wanting them to tell me I had made something great and powerful. And most laughably of all, I wanted people to say that they were moved spiritually, that they understood grace a little better, that God spoke through it yet I wasn’t involving God in the writing. (And don’t mistake me: God can involve Himself in whatever He sees fit to with or without anyone knowing or recognizing it. My point here is that my heart was impure.)

What then? Now that I’m being honest—with myself and God and everyone else too—how do I untangle this? How do I put writing back where it is meant to be and bow my heart again to God?

Well, thank goodness I’m not doing it by myself. It’s been a lot of thinking and praying and wrestling with the Holy Spirit and opening hands and remembering and relearning truth I’ve somehow forgotten and coming back to full, true worship and communion with Him for the first time in weeks.

Why am I posting this on the blog? Because I’ve read that being honest and real (and ten other buzzwords like “authentic”) is important, and also because it hurts my pride more than just little to admit (on the freaking internet) that I struggled hard with things that this post and this post would have everyone believe I’m so far over.

There is always the danger that the things we love will become something they shouldn’t, will take on a role they aren’t meant to, and my prayer is that the Holy Spirit will help mightily, just like He helps me and is patient with me.

With love,

Rosalie <3

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5 Ways To Blast Through Writer’s Block (Or Any Creative Slump) And Make Good Art [a guest post by Abbiee]

Happy Monday!

We have a very special guest on Penprints today; the brilliant Abbie Emmons is here to teach us how to blast through writer’s block!

So, I now turn the floor (er, keyboard? screen?) over to Abbiee.


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abbiee headshotWhat’s up, my friend? I’m Abbiee, and I don’t like to fit in a box. I’m an indie artist, musician, writer, blogger, youtuber, and professional waffle-eater. I do what I do because I love it. And I truly believe that if we do more of what we love, we WILL spread joy and inspiration to the rest of the world. I’d like to take a moment to shout a HUGE THANK YOU to Rosalie for inviting me to guest post on her lovely blog today! Rosalie is a SUPERNOVA STAR YO and I’m honored to be here. :’)

Let’s talk about that nasty thing us creatives know too well: WRITER’S BLOCK. And if you’re not a writer (good idea tbh) these helpful tips could also apply to any artist who is having a creative slump, just feeling “blah” about their work. Because no matter what type of art we’re creating, WE JUST WANT TO MAKE IT GOOD. Right?? And when our creativity comes to a grinding halt out of nowhere, we panic. What if we can no longer write?? Or do anything?? EVER?? It’s a terrifying prospect, seeing as we’ve poured 110% of our heart and soul into our work and without a good return on that investment…let’s just say I feel bad for everyone we know.

After about fifteen years of writing, I’ve blasted through quite a few spells of writer’s block. AND IT’S HARD. But there are a few things that I find make it easier to keep going, keep creating, and hopefully avoid a midnight existential crisis. HERE WE GO.

#1: Do the thing when it’s hard

blog_02Might as well throw the most uncomfortable one at you right out of the gate: WRITE WHEN YOU DON’T WANT TO. When you’re like “ugh I’m really not feeling it today.” If you’re not writing because you feel stuck, WHY EXACTLY do you feel stuck? I don’t have the answer to this – you do. So ask yourself why and try to figure it out. Is it because you’ve actually run out of ideas/inspiration? Or is it simply because you’re afraid that what you’re going to write will be awful? More often than not, I fall into the latter category.* I’m afraid that whatever I create won’t be good. But here’s the funny thing: A LOT OF TIMES IT TURNS OUT GREAT. And I never saw that coming because it felt so hard.

There are times when you can’t push it – everything just becomes utter chaos. And then there are times when you persevere and get AMAZING results. The more you build up resistance to giving up, the less often you’ll WANT to give up.

*There’s obviously more than two categories here lololol like of course there’s the “my pet goldfish just died and now literally nothing makes sense in life” category and if that’s you I am sincerely sorry <3

#2: Flip the thing upside-down

Maybe it’s an idea or a concept or a chapter (or THE WHOLE BOOK SOMETIMES LET’S FACE IT) that’s driving you mad. Try flipping it on its head. My father is an artist/inventor and he taught me this once when I was experiencing writer’s block. He told me a story about how he was working on an invention and it just wasn’t working…so he tried flipping the whole thing upside-down. Like, literally. And it suddenly worked! So he advised I try it with the first chapter of my manuscript. (Essentially playing the whole thing backwards.) I tried it, and loved it.

But maybe it’s not a particular scene or chapter or book that’s driving you mad – maybe it’s the way in which you create. Maybe it’s your habit, your routine, that’s blocking your creativity. TRY FLIPPING THAT UPSIDE-DOWN, TOO. You know that Other Person™ who has a totally different creative process than you? Maybe you’re organized and they’re messy; maybe you’re a plotter and they’re a pantser. Try working like they work – just for a day! I know you look at them and think “I would never be able to work like that.” But you never know until you try! And testing something new is always better than sitting around bemoaning your writer’s block.

#3: Get moving

blog_001According to my own professional research,* EXERCISE HELPS WRITER’S BLOCK. It only makes sense, right? Sedentary body = sedentary mind. If you’re feeling stuck, maybe it’s simply because you’ve been sitting in one place, staring at a screen for HOURS AND HOURS. You don’t have to go sweat under a bench press – a short walk will do the trick. Fresh air is also a bonus! GET OUTSIDE. DON’T FOLLOW MY BAD EXAMPLE.** Or, if you’re super angry at your book, PUNCH A HEAVYBAG FOR TEN MINUTES. < Super yummy stress reliever right there.

*OK OK my research is not professional it is 100% experiential but here’s an article about exercise and creativity if you don’t believe me.
**My Bad Example™ explained: sitting inside all day and watching the great outdoors from the safety of my tower. I MEAN HOUSE. I mean…I might actually be Rapunzel??? Shh don’t tell anyone. Just send me Flynn Rider ASAP.

#4: Remember why you’re doing it

Purpose begets passion. You started writing that book for a reason, RIGHT?? If you didn’t, make one up. Do it right now. Take a piece of paper and a pen and think of one good reason and write it down and look at it while you work. It’s easy to get stuck; it’s hard to get unstuck. That’s basically how writer’s block works. But if you have a really good reason to keep going, it’s going to be that much harder to stop. HOW you create doesn’t matter. WHAT you create doesn’t matter. WHY you create is what gets you out of bed in the morning.

#5: Uplift yourself

blog_03.jpgListen to empowering music! Watch an inspiring movie! Eat waffles! Have a pep-talk with your local sage!* Make yourself HAPPY again. Because happiness determines your ultimate success. I mean, sure – if you’re writing a sad scene or something, feeling a little blue might help you. But if you’re CHRONICALLY DOWNCAST…your creativity is going to suffer. So don’t work yourself ragged! Take a chill pill – enjoy some time with your friends and family. Relax and restore. A happy person is a successful person, regardless of what they create.

*My local sage, I’ve learned, is my mom. 10/10 recommend chatting with parents about this sort of thing. SO RESTORING.

What is your favorite way to blast through writer’s block (or any other creative slump)? Are you going to try some of these tips next time you feel stuck? HINT: YOU SHOULD. Add to this list in the comments!

rock on,
abbiee

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Interview with Aimee Meester [writer and producer of the Bright Eyes Podcast]

It’s Monday, kids, and that means good times all around here on Penprints.

Last month, the first episode of the Bright Eyes podcast was released, and I was quickly, irrevocably hooked. It’s a science fiction podcast following the adventures of Trish Odessa, the pilot-turned-captain of the Ender in the wake of her untimely, unexplained promotion. Much mystery, suspense, and space ensue.

And Aimee Meester, the writer and producer of the podcast, has graciously agreed to do an interview!

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Rosalie: Hey, Aimee! Welcome to Penprints! :D I’m so jazzed to have you “here” to tell us about your podcast, Bright Eyes. To start with, can you share a little bit about yourself for those who don’t know of you?

aimee meester.jpgAimee: Thanks so much for having me! I’m Aimee, obviously — I’m a writer and storyteller and lover of all things sci-fi, including podcasts, obviously. My favorite genre is anything weird and right now I’m probably at home with my cat because that’s how I roll.

R: Cats = aw, yesssssss. SO, why sci-fi and anything weird? What has drawn you to those genres?

A: I grew up on Star Wars and Star Trek, so it just kind of grew on me as I grew up. Then I discovered the world of weird genres beyond that, and I was totally lost. (I’ll be in love with steampunk forever.) I adore spaceships, and the future, and the wild creativity and imagination you have in these genres.

R: Wow, so cool. So with your love for and background in sci-fi, what was your inspiration for Bright Eyes?

A: So it was actually… Star Trek: Beyond. :P I came out of the theater pumped up and excited about bright colors and spaceships and sci-fi that’s not so much dark and gritty (though I love that) as it is neon and fast-paced. Novels are standard for me, so that’s how it started…but as I started to discover fiction podcasts I realized this could be the perfect format for something that wasn’t working as a straight up novel.

whyR: Ohhhh, I love Star Trek: Beyond! You touched on it a little bit already, but can you explain a little more as to why you wanted to put out a story via podcast instead of more “traditional” avenues?

A: Honestly I just thought it would be cool! I’m a fan of finding different and creative formats for storytelling, and discovering podcasts blew my mind. The challenge and newness of it appealed to me, and it was awesome when I finally had an idea that fit with that format.

R: And after the initial decision to produce a podcast, what steps did you take to create it, and what have been some of your favorite/most challenging parts of the whole process?

A: I really just started out with no plan. I didn’t know how I was going to voice characters (I thought it might be me for a little bit!), I didn’t know how I would get it out there, I had zero equipment, no experience. I didn’t even actively start looking for people to help. I started writing episodes anyway, just cranking them out, getting out all my ideas and putting together my ideal episodes. I really don’t know where I would be if I had tried to get everything together before I started writing. It helped HUGELY to start with what I could do and go from there. Then Sydney and Cyrus, my crew, found me on Twitter through a series of happy accidents, and we got to work on the actual music and voice work.

My favorite part of this whole process is the collaboration. It’s fun to create a story by yourself, but it’s something totally different to create a story and characters with other people. I’m lucky to work with two people who really understand the project and have so many things to add in ways that I lack, which is nice. We fill in each other’s blank spots in that way. I write all the words and the story, yeah, but then it goes through Sydney, and her tone and voicework and the way she expresses and emphasizes things adds a whole new layer, and then Cyrus adds music and sound effects that add another layer. By the time it’s finished and out there it’s something none of us could have created on our own and I love that so much. It’s always a joy listening to the final episode and hearing what it’s become.

ai motto 2My least favorite part is adjusting to the fact that I’m writing for audio, and I’m writing for someone else’s voice. Obviously I have control over the words I write, but writing novels (which is the thing I’m used to doing) is hugely different from writing something that’s made only for audio. I have to constantly remind myself that this can’t sound pretty, there can’t be descriptions, it has to sound like someone talking. I also have to keep in mind Sydney’s voice and how she says things. Which sounds weird, but there are some phrases that she’s going to do awkwardly and some that work much better for her and how she voices the character, and the more I hear of her voice in this project the more I have to adjust myself to write accordingly. It turns out great, but it’s a bit of a pain when you’re not used to it.

R: Wow, that is so interesting! Thank you for sharing! Now, I’ve seen Bright Eyes spark a ton of interest in creating fiction podcasts. So, for any of the aspiring writers and podcasters (let’s just say that’s a word), what would be three pieces of advice you would give them as they set out to produce a podcast?

A: 0. “podcaster” is totally a word.

As for real, actual advice…

  1. Just start writing it. I don’t care if you don’t have anything lined up, if you don’t know what you’re going to do with it. Don’t wait. If you have an idea, and you want to make it happen, just start writing it. Nothing is going to happen until you have something on the page, I can promise you that.
  2. Listen to other podcasts! I’m begging you, listen to other fiction podcasts. Just like you read lots of books if you want to write books, you have to consume lots of what you’re trying to create. Podcasts don’t follow the rules of books. You have to train your brain to approach writing them in a totally different way. They’re written differently, in different ways, with different focuses, and you should probably be familiar with that before you try anything. Some great examples and places to start are Welcome to Night Vale (urban fantasy), Within the Wires (sci-fi), Sayer (hard sci-fi), Limetown (paranormal/horror), Wooden Overcoats (humor, soap-opera-y)…
  3. Don’t do it on your own. You’ll go insane.

R: Wow, thank you so much for all the fantastic insights, Aimee. And thank you for taking the time to share a little about your journey with Bright Eyes. I can’t wait for the next episode!


You can find Aimee on her website, her blog, Instagram, and Twitter.

You can listen to episodes one, two, and three of Bright Eyes, and episode four releases on August 21.

And the hashtag to use is: #wheresmilo.

Have you heard of Bright Eyes? Are you thinking of writing a fiction podcast? Are you a sci-fi fan?

With love,

Rosalie

32 Things that Inspire Me [as a storyteller]

As I’ve been working through this latest draft of my novel, I’ve been hard pressed to stay filled up creatively and mine all avenues of inspiration. So, for this post, I wanted to share some of the things/people/sayings that inspire me as a storyteller (in no particular order).

So let’s get started.

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  1. Pretty books. As in, books that are just visually appealing.
  2. Fire. Give me all the candles. And also the matches. And also an adorable little oil lamp.
  3. Lovely words. I.E. – words that just sound or look lovely. Esperance. Immure. Anathema. Temerity. Duende. Equipoise. Tyro. Aeonian. Chimerical. Those are all English words, and they. are. beautiful.
  4. Isaiah 35. This chapter. Oh, goodness. I want to tell of these streams in the desert and waters in the wasteland and the God who put them there.
  5. Wonder Woman. That’s right. The movie Wonder Woman inspires me so much as a storyteller. Don’t even get me started.
  6. Basically any song by The Gray Havens.
  7. “We write down made-up stories to tell the truths we wish we could say out loud.” – Unknown.
  8. My brother, Caleb.
  9. Mara, Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw. *whispers* It’s just. so. good.
  10. Christopher Nolan. Caleb (the aforementioned brother who inspires me as a storyteller and also just as a person) pointed out to me that Christopher Nolan has directed a superhero trilogy, a movie on interstellar travel, and is now coming out with a World War II movie. And he’s done it all so well. I want tell stories like him.
  11. “You must write every single day of your life. You must lurk in libraries and climb the stacks like ladders to sniff books like perfumes and wear books like hats upon your crazy heads. May you be in love every day for the next 20,000 days. And out of that love, remake the world.” – Ray Bradbury.
  12. The Lord of the Rings. It’s a morally beautiful story, it’s a masterfully built storyworld, and it’s timeless.
  13. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty. Now I need to go watch this movie again because it’s been a couple months.
  14. The Gospels. This is the story I want to tell over and over and over again, and I want a piece of it reflected in some way in all the stories I write.
  15. C.S. Lewis.
  16. Anything written by C.S. Lewis.
  17. The ocean. I’ve only seen the ocean once, but when I did, just sitting out by it at sunrise was incredible.
  18. Limitless (the tv show). Heroes who are good are not out of style.
  19. Ecclesiastes 9:10.
  20. Empty notebooks. I just want to smell their pages and fill them all.
  21. “You can make anything by writing.” – C.S. Lewis
  22. Nadine Brandes.
  23. Havah by Tosca Lee. The richness of this book, the poetry of the prose, the thought in the story. Agh. So good.
  24. Thunderstorms. Lightning is literally exploding through the air, and water is falling from the sky. People, this is inspiring.
  25. The Dark Knight Trilogy.
  26. The Out of Time Series by Nadine Brandes. Are any of us surprised?
  27. Mary Weber. The pieces of her heart I’ve seen through her writing are a-mazing.
  28. Arrival. So, this was kind of weird and not the best movie I’ve seen, but they tried to do something different and tell a story in a way that stretches the mind. Oh, and it’s all about the power of a language.
  29. Steve Laube. I had the pleasure of having an appointment with him at Realm Makers 2015, and then I got to sit in on one of his sessions. Oh. Goodness. He knows the power of stories and the responsibility of storytellers who are Christians.
  30. The Lion King. Don’t even get me started, kids.
  31. Isaiah 6:1-7. I will retell this in any way I can.
  32. My dad.

So that’s it, kids! Those are 32 things that inspire me as a storyteller!

What about you? What makes your passion come alive? What ideas and attitudes and examples do you strive for?

With love,

Rosalie <3

P.S. – there is no post script to this post…. or is there? All our minds = blown.

11 Things I’ve Done to Avoid Working on My Novel

Procrastination is a thing, kids.

It’s a real issue.

You likely struggle with it (or have struggled with it at some point in your life). I struggle with it. It’s amazing—all the things we do when we procrastinate.

No, I’m not saying it’s okay or cool to procrastinate (even though we sometimes do cool thing when we procrastinate); in fact, I very much advise against it. But, I don’t typically take my own advice.

So I’ve fallen into another procrastination rut, and today I was thinking about all the things I’ve done to avoid working on my WIP. The list is fairly varied—from things everybody does (like mindless hours on social media) to a few slightly more… unique ways to NOT be working on my novel. No, I’m not proud of it, but it’s the truth.

So let’s dive in, shall we?

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  1. Doing dishes.

This is lame on a few different levels. First, I’m supposed to be doing dishes anyway, so this shouldn’t be a phenomenon. Second, dishes? Instead of writing, dishes? Instead of plotting rebellions and battling dragons, dishes? Something is very wrong with this picture.

  1. Sleep.

Everyone probably does this, but I got it bad. Napping, guys, so alluring on a day off or a Sunday afternoon. Should I be writing? That would be a yes. Am I going to take a nap instead? Probably.

  1. Marathoning Limitless.

I can justify this a few different ways. Relaxation. Creativity recharge. Unique storytelling. It feeds my mad genius. Blah, blah, blah. (p.s. – you should probably watch Limitless the TV show. It only lasted one season, but that one season was en pointe.)

  1. Planting tomatoes under a blazing, blistering sun.

Yes, those tomato plants did need to get in the garden and all that jazz, but it came down to tomatoes or novel, and I picked tomatoes (and did I mention that that sun was blazing and blistering?).

Also, since planting said tomatoes, I’ve been able to opt out of more than one quick writing session to go water the tomatoes because apparently you can’t just stick them in the ground and expect great things (something about care and horticulture or something or other), and so that has resulted in several occurrences of “Oh, I should go write, but it’s a real bummer *wink wink* that those tomatoes need water to survive”.

  1. Reading various blogs about editing and revisions.

In case you’re new to Penprints, you should probably know that I’m in the editing stage of my WIP. Most of the heavy lifting is done when it comes to big revisions, but there are still a few things that need to change to redirect the story in a better direction. This is where the wonderful internet comes in.

The Story of How I End Up Reading Blog After Blog About Editing:

Me: “I’ve got half an hour of free time! I should go write!”

Also Me: “But do you really know what you’re doing? You should probably do some more research on this whole editing thing before you, you know, actually do editing.”

Me: “But I’ve read a couple books on editing and lots of blogs already! I just have to muscle through this and do it!”

Also Me: “Shhhhhhhhhhh. Just go find some more blog posts that talk about the ten thousand things you have to keep in mind while editing. It won’t overwhelm you at all.”

Me: “Good idea. Overthinking this is definitely the way to go.”

  1. Cleaning my room and study.

In case you didn’t read that right, I’ll say it again: cleaning my room and study. Wut? I thought about working on my novel, and the idea was so frightening to me that I decided to tear apart my room and then put it back together (that was three evenings down the drain this time) so that I wouldn’t have time to go through revisions. Something is very wrong with me.

  1. Starbucks trips with my friend, Amanda.

Now, this may not sound like a bad thing, and it isn’t (it’s that whole iron sharpening iron jazz). However, when Amanda and I get Starbucks, it’s not like an hour of chatting it up and talking about all the things. It’s like three solid hours of greatness. (Full disclosure, I actually see no down-side to this one because relationships trump writing every time, but I felt like I had to mention it because our latest hang out may or may not have resulted in neither of us finishing our to-do’s for last week. #oops #sorrynotsorry) (ALSO, Amanda is the gardening guru who gave me those tomato plants I told you about a minute ago, so there’s that too.)

  1. Lying around on the couch thinking about editing.

This is when I’m “trying to get motivated” because apparently a rapidly approaching deadline is not motivating enough. I sprawl on the couch and think wistfully of how I wish my novel would edit itself, and, please, for the love of all that is good, actually turn out to be the stunning, amazing, earth-shattering novel it is in my head. Too much time is passed in wistful reflection on the couch. Far too much.

  1. Marathoning season 3 of The Flash.

Yeah, this also has happened. I’ll tell my sister, “Arielle, I don’t have time to watch a movie tonight because I have to work on my novel. All I’ve got time for is an episode of The Flash.” But then, five episodes later, no editing has occurred.

  1. Rereading the earliest versions of Beauty and the Beast.

I convince myself this is a good thing because it’s “research”. Lol, it’s not.

  1. Writing this blog post.

First, I spent half an hour trying to come up with something to blog about this week. Guys, I can edit almost a whole chapter in half an hour sometimes. Then, of course, I chuckled manically while reflecting on all the things I’ve done instead of writing and spent the rest of the night (aka: Prime Editing Time) writing up this post on all the things I’ve been doing instead of working on my novel instead of working on my novel (see what I did there?).


So now I’m going to actually go work on my novel and stop procrastinating. Or not. We’ll see.

What about you? What sorts of things have you done in the name of Procrastination? What are some projects you’ve been avoiding? How do you not procrastinate (and you can’t say you “just do it” because that is cruel and unhelpful for those of us ailed with procrastination tendencies)?

With love,

Rosalie

P.S. – don’t forget to enter to win a print copy of The Girl Who Could See by Kara Swanson (this giveaway is open only to you, my dear followers).

P.P.S. – I find this whole post depressingly amusing and ridiculous, just so you know.